Small Demon
Apr 172009
 

It stands to reason that hot weather cultures would be good at making refreshing cold drinks, but the Vietnamese are real artists. Before my lunch today, I had an iced coffee — a double shot of espresso, which is served in a tall glass of ice with sugar syrup in a little pitcher on the side for sweetening to taste. And with my lunch I had lime juice frothed up with crushed ice and just enough sugar to take the edge off.

Jan 082009
 

I guess I could have begun counting from the final day of classes last semester, but today is the first day I would have gone into the classroom had I been teaching, so this feels like the first official day of my sabbatical. Have I said that I am wildly grateful for such a luxury? If I haven’t, I am. At a time when many of my fellow citizens are losing their jobs, don’t have health insurance, lack adequate housing, etc., to be paid to sit home & think feels almost immoral. Perhaps that’s an old streak of Protestantism coming to the surface; if so, it’s a reminder that Protestantism was originally about social justice and individual dignity / responsibility. The best way I can see to redeem — don’t you love how the religious vocabulary emerges? — my time is to make effective use of it. So far, this has been a pretty lazy winter break: I’ve done a lot of reading, but dropped studying Vietnamese; I wrote a couple of stories, but haven’t looked at any of my poems in weeks; I’ve shoveled a good deal of snow, but I have been very lazy in the kitchen, falling into auto-cook mode most of the time.

I’m going to try to blog regularly during the sabbatical, mostly as a form of self-discipline & self-reflection. I’m not oing to make any foolhardy commitments to post something every day, but that will be my goal, even if it’s just a squib or a report on local bird life or what I cooked for dinner. With luck, there will also be more substantial bits as well. Anyway, it’s cold & snowy this morning & I probably won’t go farther afield today than the post office (though Carole is heading off to work in a few minutes), so the weather is cooperating: no excuse but to get some real work done.

Dec 172008
 

This report from CNN on newly discovered species in the Mekong River basin is really quite amazing. I would love to see a Laotian rock rat next spring when I go to the delta, but I have no desire to eat one. The consumption of exotic animals — because they are exotic — was one of my biggest clashes of values with Vietnamese culture when I lived there. That, and a certain disdane for the suffering of all animals, really got to me. And I found it strange, too, in a Buddhist country. Buddhism’s doctrine that the world is defined by suffering has two sides: compassion and indifference. Over the course of their history the Vietnamese have had to sometimes eak out a living off of a parsimonious & capricious nature, which has led them to take a catholic view of what and what is not appropriate for eating. When you’re hungry, that coconut grub might look pretty tasty. I’m not an anthropologist, but it seems to me that there must be some symbolic process through with a food originally eaten for survival becomes a food of particularly high status, especially when times are more lavish.

Feb 262008
 

Indian DinnerI don’t know much about Indian food other than that I like to eat it; I’ve had a couple of Indian cookbooks for a while, but only this year began really trying to cook from them. Saturday night, I made Kashmiri style lamb kabobs in curry, potato raita (which I had never heard of until I found it in the back of the cookbook), snap peas cooked in a little ghee with sesame seeds, & chapati. Served with a little salad of cucumbers and coriander. This was the first whole Indian meal I’ve made — previously, I had just made individual dishes, usually a curry. Came out very nicely. Amy contributed a cherry pie for desert: not Indian, but excellent — the sweetness after the mild heat of the curry was lovely. We drank a couple of bottle of Riesling with the meal. All the recipes came from Camellia Panjabi’s Great Curries of India, a beautifully produced & well-written book with a lot of color photos & very good background information on the food & ingredients.

 Posted by at 9:55 am
Oct 142007
 

Brought in the last of the peppers yesterday since we’re now having freezing nights. We’re drying them in various places around the house, including beneath the spice cabinet.

Hanging Peppers

Peppers 2007

 Posted by at 10:00 am