THE CRITICAL FLAME :: Henry Gould on Stuart Blazer

The shadowy caricature lurking behind every designated Emersonian Poet-as-force-of-nature is the poet as local crank, missing out on history while re-inventing the wheel.

via THE CRITICAL FLAME :: Henry Gould on Stuart Blazer.

Poetry on the Brain: A Bittersweet Symphony

Talk about hitting my sweet spots — here is a blog about poetry and neuroscience! I think I found it via Don Share’s (Poetry Magazine) Twitter feed. Comes at a good time for me, since I’m writing an essay that touches on poetry & brain science.

Poetry on the Brain: A Bittersweet Symphony.

Why I hate the myth of the suffering artist | Books | guardian.co.uk

Why I hate the myth of the suffering artist | Books | guardian.co.uk. Well, life is suffering, or so the Buddha said. Though he was interested in breaking the cycle, not fetishizing pain.

The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative – NYTimes.com

The Sentence as a Miniature Narrative – NYTimes.com. Sentences are hot right now. The writer’s Chronicle had a terrible essay, Stanley Fish wrote an okay book, but this series of articles looks promising. I’m always trying to get my students to pay attention to sentences, but they mostly take them for granted, just the plastic cup that holds the beer.

Rosanne Cash, Bodhisattva

Master Dogen Zenji writes, in the Genjokoan, that many fully actualized Buddhas have no idea that they are Buddhas:

When buddhas are truly buddhas they do not necessarily notice that they are buddhas. However, they are actualized buddhas, who go on actualizing buddhas.

Rosanne Cash says she is not a Buddhist because she “kills ants and eats meat,” but what does she know? (Some of the most rigorous Buddhists I know eat meat from time to time.)