Second Round of Chemotherapy Winding Down

The second round of my oral chemo has five more days to run. This second run went fine until a couple of days ago when enough chemical built up in my system to cause considerable nausea. There is nothing, really, to be said about nausea. Everybody knows what it's like, though reportedly some people find vomiting less awful than others. I am among the "others." Jenny Diski writes in In Gratitude that "there is nothing [she] dislikes more than being sick," and goes on a little later to put it in these terms: "Do I want to live another year or so [by taking the chemo pills] or do I want to feel ill and eat when I haven't the slightest appetite?" To do this chemo you have eat food with your medication--otherwise your body, quite rightly, rejects it in the quickest way it knows how. Diski comments on her own question: "It's a new perspective." Given the choice between being consistently ill and adding , in her case, a year or so of life expectancy, Diski chooses to forego the chemotherapy, accept an earlier death, & to die, at least, without the added indignity of regular nausea & vomiting. Diski's chemotherapy must have been much more unpleasant that mine, since it is only the final week of each run that has even approached what she describes. But I am far from criticizing her choice. Especially for a writer, someone who works with her mind, being deprived of the ability to think clearly because of nausea would be a terrible deprivation--in her circumstances, I might well make the same decision. The second round (of three) of my chemotherapy has five more days to run; then I will have two weeks off, then another 28 days on. (Funny that they use the moon calendar rather than the solar to set the duration.) I'm dealing with it pretty well, all things considered. Have been getting some writing done, taking care of the business of life, with only the occasional bout of misery. Considering that this is supposed to buy me some indefinite period of more or less normal life when it is over, I've made the bargain--I'll stick it out. Of course, contemplating that "indefinite period" and what lies beyond it can be depressing, but I try to dwell as much as possible in the moment.

Author: jd

Joseph Duemer is Professor of Literature Emeritus at Clarkson University in northern New York state. His most recent book of poems is Magical Thinking from Ohio State University Press. Since the mid-1990s he has spent a good deal of time in Vietnam, mostly Hanoi. He lives with his wife Carole & five terriers (four Jack Russells & one Patterdale) on the stony bank of the Raquette River in South Colton.