There is No Science of Consciousness; Or, Talking Animals

What follows is either a piece of grammatical / ontological speculation, or a shaggy dog story[1. Scouting around for a brief definition of the phrase shaggy dog story, I found Wikipedia straightforward but appreciated the compact irony of the Urban Dictionary: "A joke, usually long, with a silly premise, often involving talking animals."]--probably the latter. I was reading this report of a conference on the nature of consciousness in the NY Times when it occurred to me that there can be no "science of consciousness" because science is a product of consciousness. We can & do have consciousness of science, because science is a product of consciousness--an aspect--not the other way around. Maybe it's just a trick of grammar & cannot be generalized, but it's a trick that reveals something important. One does not say "the science of earth" for Geology (though we might well say Earth Science, which is itself revealing); nor does one say "the science of animals" for Zoology. Should one consider nouns like geology & zoology as highly compressed forms of apposition? If so, what does that imply? And why has no one yet proposed Consciousology as a name for this new science?

Author: jd

Joseph Duemer is Professor of Literature Emeritus at Clarkson University in northern New York state. His most recent book of poems is Magical Thinking from Ohio State University Press. Since the mid-1990s he has spent a good deal of time in Vietnam, mostly Hanoi. He lives with his wife Carole & five terriers (four Jack Russells & one Patterdale) on the stony bank of the Raquette River in South Colton.