Why Vietnam?

Every time I take a trip to Vietnam--averaging every couple of years since the mid-1990s--I'm asked what it is about Vietnam that draws me back again & again. It's a reasonable question & one to which I have a set answer, but it's an answer that doesn't fully satisfy me. I usually say that, given my age, I have an inescapable historical connection to Vietnam. But that doesn't explain, really, why I'm sitting in Logan International waiting for a 1:30 a.m. flight to Hong Kong, jumping then to Hanoi. And it doesn't explain why I've now made twelve (I think) extended trips to Vietnam since 1996, including a Fulbright year in 2000 - 2001. It must be love. I feel comfortable in Vietnam, especially Hanoi, which is less frenetic & less Westernized than HCMC. It's not as if Hanoi is like home--I don't feel "at home"--but I am attracted to the particular kinds of difference I experience there. And it certainly is different--the interpersonal expectations can take some getting used to. Social life is based on relationships of hierarchy, but also of trust, however paradoxical that may seem. Then there is that long sweep of history that gives weight to both social interactions and the arts, though much of this historical weight is being eroded by the forces of globalization. Why Vietnam? What is it about going far from home that feels so lively & rewarding? Over the next few weeks I'm going to keep coming back to these questions, though I know in advance that whatever sort of answer(s) I come up with will be protean, shifting, unstable.

Author: jd

Joseph Duemer is Professor of Literature Emeritus at Clarkson University in northern New York state. His most recent book of poems is Magical Thinking from Ohio State University Press. Since the mid-1990s he has spent a good deal of time in Vietnam, mostly Hanoi. He lives with his wife Carole & five terriers (four Jack Russells & one Patterdale) on the stony bank of the Raquette River in South Colton.