Herman Wouk’s WW2 Novels

I read Winds of War & War and Remembrance three decades ago on the recommendation of my friend & colleague Stanley Hodson. They struck me as good history and good fiction at the time, and I've recently listened to the audiobook versions of the novels narrated by Kevin Pariseau--all 102 hours. I still find them so. Does anyone ever compare these novels to War and Peace? Both are panoramic narratives of families & individuals caught up in the tidal forces of historical events, yet I have the sense that Wouk's books are commonly thought of as "popular" (as opposed to "literary") fiction. Is this the case? If so, why? I can't read Russian, so I cannot evaluate the beauties of Tolstoy's prose, but the translation I'm familiar with, by Anthony Briggs, doesn't seem qualitatively superior to Wouk's prose in his pair of novels. I was particularly impressed, this time through the narrative, with the dialogic inclusion of excerpts from a (fictional) memoir by a fictional German general, Armin von Roon, imprisoned after the war for war crimes, "translated" after his own retirement from the Navy by the novels' main character Victor Henry, who occasionally responds to von Roon's interpretation of events in "translator's notes." The excruciatingly drawn out tragedy of errors that takes Natalie Jastrow Henry & her uncle, a popular Jewish historian of Christianity, from the Italian hill town of Sienna to Auschwitz functions as a kind of danse macabre in counterpoint to the heroic struggles of the Allies against the Axis.

Author: jd

Joseph Duemer is Professor of Literature Emeritus at Clarkson University in northern New York state. His most recent book of poems is Magical Thinking from Ohio State University Press. Since the mid-1990s he has spent a good deal of time in Vietnam, mostly Hanoi. He lives with his wife Carole & five terriers (four Jack Russells & one Patterdale) on the stony bank of the Raquette River in South Colton.