Small Demon
Jan 152009
 

The novelist Stewart O’Nan came to Clarkson last fall to give the Convocation address & while he was here I had a couple of chances to talk to him, once at dinner, once the next day. He amazed me by reading my book, which I gave him at dinner, by the time we talked the following afternoon. He took notes. And since I’d read some of his fiction, we were able to have one of those good nuts & bolts kind of conversations writers like to enjoy when there is nobody else around to bore. Over the course of that conversation, Stewart suggested I try writing fiction. I really hadn’t written a story since I was an undergraduate & even then I tended to write poetic prose rather than stories. But after Stewart left I began reading his stories, then Chekhov, then everything I could get my hands on, trying to absorb the genre into my creative genome.

A month or so into this reading, I began toying with an idea for a story, taking notes and turning it over in my mind, and was on the verge of sitting down to write when another idea struck me — an image, really, & then an event. Over the next couple of weeks I wrote that story straight through and then did a quick revision. It ran to 5000 words, much longer than I had expected when I began. I sent that story, called “Bye Bye Blackbird” (after the Mel Tormé song that figures in the plot) to my mentor & to another fiction writer I know, neither of whom dismissed it as worthless. In fact, both were encouraging & very kind to my initial effort.I made some revisions & sent the piece off to a magazine that has previously published my poetry & as of this writing I await their response.

That first story concerns a boy, age 9, told in the third person; I began another story about the same boy about a dozen years later, also in third person point of view, but got hung up about half-way through the arc of the plot. (In both stories, I knew in general what was going to happen, but I didn’t know until I was actually writing how it was going to happen.) I set the half-finished story aside & focused on reading as many stories as I could.

In the meantime, I saw an ad in one of the writer’s magazines for a “short-short” story competition: under 1000 words. I had been taking notes for stories and characters in my notebook for several weeks & thought it would be a good exercise to try something very short. Most of the story ideas I had jotted down had something to do with the later life of the boy in the first story & this short-short turned out to be in the voice of his friend, a few years older, when they are both in their twenties. The friend is a bartender and speaks in the first person about a seemingly trivial  incident that occurred in the bar where he was working, but that has stuck with him — he is looking back on the experience several years later. What I didn’t expect is that this same character had another, longer story to tell, in which the boy from the first story is a college student.

On autobiography: I would be lying if I claimed that the central character of the first story was not “me” in some sense, but the events in the story did not happen to the actual me when I was a child. Actually, I took more of the setting than the action from my own experience. The same goes for the later stories — the boy is certainly some version of myself, but combined with aspects of people I knew or know, but the actual events did not happen to me & are in that sense entirely fictional. The very short story, titled “Faith,” doesn’t not feature the boy at all, the speaker being a combination of three different people I knew when I was young; the second bartender story, titled “Charity,” is told from the point of view of the boy’s friend and thus gives an external view of his character.

I have now returned to the story I’d gotten stuck on, moving it slowly forward — in all these pieces I have written straight through, not composing in pieces the way I do with poetry, & only making a few notes about pieces of specific language that I think will be needed later in the piece. This working straight through keeps me in suspense & keeps the action open. As I said, I know in general where the story is headed, but I don’t know how it is going to arrive there, which path will rise from the details to create a structure.

In both of the longer third person stories about the boy, first as a child then as a young man, I am including bits and pieces of actual times & places — in the first, some details about pop music and JFK, in the second, news reports of the fall of Saigon occur at intervals throughout the story. I am attracted to this sort of nailing down the narrative to historical facts & cultural details, which I guess makes me some kind of later day realist. In any case, that’s where I am now, feeling excited & happy about this new direction my work has taken. I was feeling as if my poetry had become narrower & narrower in its concerns & techniques & for whatever reason was no longer an appropriate place to deal with certain psychological states; but I feel free in fiction to play with a whole new set of ideas & techniques. I haven’t felt this engaged in my own creative work for several years — I only hope the results, the stories themselves, are as worthwhile as the experience of producing them.

  One Response to “On Taking Up Fiction”

  1. joseph, i mentioned yesterday a book of 3 stories from Sanjay Agnihotri’s magazine LOCAL KNOWLEDGE. the website http://www.localknowledgesite.net isn’t up yet i just heard. his email is Sanjay Agnihotri@sagni71@yahoo.com (it says in the book itself). the stories are by Diane Simmons, Martha King, and Sanjay Agnihotri (his is an excerpt from a novel).

    now i have another “take a look at this” suggestion of an echapbook (from wordrunner press in petaluma,california) called OLD CARS. i’ve read all 8 stories (around old cars) and loved them. (i come from car people:my grandad william oliver mycue at turn of 19/20th centuries built his own cars and sold them in the niagara falls/buffalo area.) this press will also publish someday in this 2009 year my propeace & antiwar poems. jo-anne rosen (a noted book designer) is the publisher & editor. i think you may like the freedom of these different, very, stories. edward mycue
    here is a link copy/paste from the press site
    http://www.echapbook.com/echaplist.htm

    Read e-Chaps Self-Publish Cost Resources/Links About Home
    Read e-chapbooks here…
    FICTION

    Old Cars. Fiction anthology from the no-name writers’ convivium:
    Wray Cotterill, Judith Day, Richard Gustafson, Chance Lucky, Orianna Pratt,
    Jo-Anne Rosen, Linda Saldaña, Susan Starbird

    Eight authors, exploring the mysterious allure of cars, write about infidelity, senility, family bonds, friendship, tough times, troubled marriages and more.

    Old Cars: photo of young man with disassembled 40s auto
    Poetry

    Coming soon, the anti-war poetry of Edward Mycue.

    Please visit again.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.