First Hard Frost

I covered the last of the basil & peppers with a tarp last night, then brought them in this morning. The weather was clear this morning, with a mist over the river that burned off early & we had a couple of hours of sunshine before the clouds moved in. Raining now, temperature in the 30s. Many of the maples are completely bare of leaves, but the oaks are still green, with other species ranging through all the reds & yellows. Leaves fall in numbers as I write this. Filled the bird feeders yesterday & I've seen nuthatches, chickadees, a harry woodpecker & a few finches. There are still a few Canada geese hanging around & the crows are setting up winter quarters in the woods. We've had a few evening fires in the wood stove over the last couple of weeks, but yesterday was the first time we built it back up in the morning. The stove will be going pretty much continuously now until mid-March.

Author: jd

Joseph Duemer is Professor of Literature Emeritus at Clarkson University in northern New York state. His most recent book of poems is Magical Thinking from Ohio State University Press. Since the mid-1990s he has spent a good deal of time in Vietnam, mostly Hanoi. He lives with his wife Carole & five terriers (four Jack Russells & one Patterdale) on the stony bank of the Raquette River in South Colton.

2 thoughts on “First Hard Frost”

  1. WE LEAVE NOTHING BEHIND

    what we experience we are
    much passes through us
    we leave nothing behind

    what we are we are
    what we have been is us
    what is left is nothing

    we leave nothing behind
    an earthworm caught in time
    much passes through us

    what we have been we were
    what is left is nothing
    we leave nothing behind

    EDWARD MYCUE

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